Thursday, 19 July 2012

Brush Stokes

Nothing to do with painting though.


This is Callistemon citrinus, commonly known as the Crimson Bottlebrush from Australia. Erm, I don't mean I bought it from Australia, I meant it originates from there. I grew it many years ago from seed. I managed to get three plants to germinate and grow. The other two succumbed to the severe winter two years ago, but this one not only survived but is flowering again. What a surprise.

When I planted it in the garden, we were experiencing relatively mild winters, and after taking a few years to settle in, it flowered every year, until the severe winter of three years ago put paid to the blooms the following summer. But that was nothing compared to the next winter; the main stem was split in half by the sheer weight of snow. After a bit of judicious pruning, and a bit of TLC, the plant began to recover. I really didn't expect it to bloom this year though. Must be all the rain.

Remember the Berberis darwinii that was attracting all the blackbirds ?  It is now being visited by squirrels. They don't pick individual berries like the birds. Oh no, they pick a bunch and eat them like grapes. Well they would, wouldn't they ?

And finally, a bit of good news; the weathermen are predicting the end of our soggy summer. Apparently, the Jet Stream is heading back up north to where it should be, and as a result we should get  normal summer weather. You know, sunshine, remember that ?  Jet Stream, eh ?  So why didn't Air Traffic Control sort it out sooner ?

18 comments:

  1. Sunshine? Hmmmmm...nah you lost me there. Off to 'google' it x

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    1. I think it's a yellow light in the sky. Can't be sure, my short term memory is playing up again.

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  2. Widziałam już je na własne oczy i byłam nimi zachwycona. Pozdrawiam.
    I've seen it with my own eyes and I was delighted with them. Yours.

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    1. Yes, we've seen it too, but I think it's gone on its holidays again now.

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  3. What a gorgeous plant - I'm surprised it has even bothered to flower in this weather - I would send it on its holidays to Australia where it can see for itself just what it is missing.

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    1. Luckily its flowering time corresponded with one of our rare fine weather events this year.

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  4. A very striking looking plant, so glad it came back from the brink.

    You made me laugh about the squirrels :-)

    Sun?....Yes please!!!!

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    1. Did you see the sun ? It was nice while it lasted.

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  5. Your weather seems to be changing just as ours is. We are getting rain after a dry spell. And that bottlebrush plant is so stunning...just beautiful.

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    1. I'm so glad the plant survived. It looked very sorry for itself last year.

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  6. Those darn jet streams! I hope they stay north of us until Christmas! It's been a lovely day in London today and we are promised well over 30 degrees by the time we get to middle of the week. Bring it on! Can't get enough sun and heat right now.
    Loved your Callistemon, wish I had room for one in my garden but they grow quite big :-)

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    1. Yes it is a bit tall, and it would have been taller if the snow hadn't damaged it.

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  7. Growing up in southern California, bottle brush plant was really common so I'm very surprised to see it in England! Your looks beautiful! Hooray for an end to your rain!

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    1. I think the rain might be coming back. Weather forecast not looking too good now.

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  8. A very cool plant. I appreciate plants that try to come back every year. It has cooled off here so we are in for a very nice August.

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    1. August not looking too good here.

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  9. Great to see Callistemon looking good in your garden. I find it hard to resist them when I see them on offer in the garden centres, wasting my time and money though.

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    1. And it would be too big to try growing it under glass.

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